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"Pluralism, the single market and the citizen: The conflict over agenda setting in media ownership regulation"

Harcourt, A. J. (1997) "Pluralism, the single market and the citizen: The conflict over agenda setting in media ownership regulation". In: UNSPECIFIED, Seattle, WA. (Unpublished)

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    Abstract

    This study will examine the politics of problem definition in the area of EU media concentration policy. The main aim of this article is to show how and why problem definition represents a crucial aspect of intra-organisational conflict and bargaining in the EU policy process, particularly by exploring the relationship between problem definition and the choice of policy instruments and solutions. A secondary aim of the article is to consider policy co-ordination in Brussels and infra-organisational conflict from a unique point of view. Conventional wisdom argues that policy issues are badly co-ordinated within the Commission (Stevens and Stevens 1996). The more or less hidden assertion is that the loose boundaries (in terms of competencies) between one DG and another originate a very cumbersome and overlapping treatment of the same issue by different actors within the Commission. In its turn, this creates a problem of policy co-ordination. Stevens and Stevens (1996:10), who have recently reviewed the state of administrative reform within the Commission, contend that the conclusion to be drawn from the foregoing survey of diagnosis, prescription and action over the past two decades is a broadly negative one. This article examines the emergence of legislation for media concentration in the EU as a case study in agenda-setting. Concentration of the media industry has become a significant issue in the EU during the last decade. This is largely due to two consequential developments: new technologies and national deregulation. Particularly in the broadcasting industry, new technologies such as geostationary satellites, digital transmission, and fiber optic cables have led to rapid market changes. Due to the large financial investments required by these technologies, media companies have engaged in mergers and acquisitions to amass the necessary financial capital. National governments have aided this by relaxing media ownership rules, including those restricting cross media ownership.

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    Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (UNSPECIFIED)
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Media.
    Subjects for non-EU documents: EU policies and themes > Policies & related activities > media
    EU policies and themes > Policies & related activities > economic and financial affairs > Single Market > general
    EU policies and themes > Policies & related activities > competition policy
    EU policies and themes > Policies & related activities > economic and financial affairs > business/private economic activity
    Subjects for EU documents: UNSPECIFIED
    EU Series: UNSPECIFIED
    ["eprint_fieldname_eusries" not defined]: UNSPECIFIED
    EU Annual Reports: UNSPECIFIED
    Conference: European Union Studies Association (EUSA) > Biennial Conference > 1997 (5th), May 29-June 1, 1997
    Depositing User: Phil Wilkin
    Official EU Document: No
    Language: English
    Date Deposited: 14 Mar 2007
    Page Range: p. 45
    Last Modified: 15 Feb 2011 17:23
    URI: http://aei.pitt.edu/id/eprint/2605

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